Dance/Heritage Research Questions and Summary (3.8)

Dance/Heritage Research Questions and Summary (3.8)

The aim of this thesis, which has guided this research from the beginning, is: To identify the cultural heritage characteristics of Egyptian raqs sharqi and evaluate if it can be considered heritage and how it locates itself within the field of ICH. The sensitizing...
Living Cultural Heritage (3.7)

Living Cultural Heritage (3.7)

Moving to a Model of Living Cultural Heritage The critique of the tangible/intangible divide, the sensitizing concepts evinced from the dance and heritage literature, the questions emerging from them and the post-dualist sociological and philosophical theories...
Using Giddens Structuration Theory for Dance Heritage (3.6)

Using Giddens Structuration Theory for Dance Heritage (3.6)

Structuration Theory Giddens’ Structuration Theory is the third conceptual tool I will use for my understanding of dance as in/tangible heritage. This theory helps to explain change in society and, therefore, a form of heritage that is in constant flow, as highlighted...
Bourdieu and the Theory of Practice (3.5)

Bourdieu and the Theory of Practice (3.5)

Connecting Tangible (Embodied) Elements of Heritage with the Intangibles (Culture) Bourdieu’s theory of practice is a useful conceptual tool to connect the tangible (embodied) elements of heritage with the intangibles (culture). As Csordas posits (1993, p. 137)...
Using Merleau-Ponty: Phenomenology for Dance Heritage (3.4)

Using Merleau-Ponty: Phenomenology for Dance Heritage (3.4)

Merleau-Ponty: Phenomenology The use of Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology has been established for a while in the field of dance studies, to overcome the dualism between the body and mind in the process of dance making and to bring to the fore the lived experience of...
The Missing Body in Heritage Studies (3.3)

The Missing Body in Heritage Studies (3.3)

Embodiment, the Body and Heritage In the previous section, Kirshenblatt-Gimblett (2004, p. 53) was quoted as suggesting that the model of ICH accords value to the carriers of oral traditions, to their ‘habitus and habit’ and that intangible heritage is alive. This is...